Our History

Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of the First Publication of Nichiren Daishonin Gosho Zenshu

“The Gosho is a work of faith, of philosophy, of daily living, of eternal peace and of boundless hope.”

Photo: Debra Williams. Designer: Jocelyn Hsu.


“The Gosho[1]The scriptures of Nichiren Buddhism are called “Gosho” in Japanese. Go means “honorable” and sho means “writings.” is a work of faith, of philosophy, of daily living, of eternal peace and of boundless hope.” [2]“Foreword,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. xii.
—Daisaku Ikeda

■ The first edition of the Gosho zenshu (The Complete Works of Nichiren Daishonin) was published on April 28, 1952 to commemorate 700 years since Nichiren Daishonin declared the supreme Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo for humanity.

■ In June 1951 shortly after Josei Toda was inaugurated as the second Soka Gakkai president, he proposed that the Soka Gakkai complete the Gosho zenshu by April 1952.

■ Prior to 1952 selections of Nichiren’s writings had been published by other Nichiren Schools, but none published his complete works.

■ Nichiren’s writings have been translated into more than 10 languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, Korean, French, German, Italian and Portuguese.

SGI President Ikeda On Nichiren’s Writings

Basing ourselves on Nichiren’s writings doesn’t mean simply revering them as sacred texts. Nor is it just lecturing and commenting on them, or turning to them as a source of comfort. Shakyamuni Buddha taught that we should base our lives on the Law. We take the correct Law and teachings of Nichiren Daishonin as the foundation of our lives. We place our faith in the Gohonzon and strive to internalize his writings as the way to free ourselves from a life consumed with suffering and become victorious.[3]March 2017 Living Buddhism, p. 45.

 

 

(p. 3)

Notes   [ + ]

1. The scriptures of Nichiren Buddhism are called “Gosho” in Japanese. Go means “honorable” and sho means “writings.”
2. “Foreword,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. xii.
3. March 2017 Living Buddhism, p. 45.