Skip to main content

Brief Guidances

We Are Sowing the Seeds of Buddhahood (Part 1 of 2)

Photo by Anthony Wallen.

We, the members of the Soka family, are the sowers of seeds. We sow the seeds of the Mystic Law, the supreme seeds of happiness and peace, spreading them far and wide. 

Nichiren Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law, writes, “All the Buddhas of the three existences and the ten directions have invariably attained Buddhahood through the seeds represented by the five characters of Myoho-renge-kyo”[1](“Letter to Akimoto,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 1015).

The daimoku of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo that we chant and share with others is the seed that enables everyone, without exception, to attain enlightenment. It is the fundamental seed that causes the lotus flower of the life state of Buddhahood, pervading not just our planet but the entire universe, to bloom luxuriously.

Kosen-rufu means working tirelessly to sow the seeds of the Mystic Law in the mire of this corrupt and defiled age and create a flower garden of happiness and peace.

In a letter to one of his disciples struggling amid the harsh challenges of society, Nichiren expresses absolute confidence in his abilities and encourages him: “I entrust you with the propagation of Buddhism in your province. It is stated that ‘the seeds of Buddhahood sprout through causation’ [The Lotus Sutra and Its Opening and Closing Sutras, p. 75]” (see “The Properties of Rice,” WND-1, 1117).  

Buddhism does not exist somewhere apart from the place of our mission, the place where we are right now.

Those who are striving as leaders of our movement are giving their all in the place where they vowed to fulfill their mission to support and encourage their fellow members and others who are wrestling with many problems. They embody the true spirit of Bodhisattvas of the Earth.

We chant wholeheartedly to spread the Mystic Law in our communities, actively meet with others and bring forth wisdom to find ways to contribute to society. Our sincere and unflagging efforts to spread Nichiren Buddhism are sowing the seeds of Buddhahood in the hearts of members and friends alike. 

This encouragement from Ikeda Sensei was originally published in the July 2018 Living Buddhism, pp. 4–5. 

To be continued in an upcoming issue

References

  1. Myoho-renge-kyo is written with five Chinese characters, while Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is written with seven. Nichiren Daishonin often uses Myoho-renge-kyo synonymously with Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in his writings. ↩︎

For Youth, a Message of Empowerment

Reconnecting to My Buddhahood