Living Buddhism

The Golden Gate Bridge

Learning from the most reconized bridge as a nod to unity of "many in body, one in mind"

Photo by RudyBalasko / Getty Images.


“Although Nichiren and his followers are few, because they are different in body, but united in mind, they will definitely accomplish their great mission of widely propagating the Lotus Sutra.”[1]“Many in Body, One in Mind,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin,
vol. 1, p. 618.
—SGI President Ikeda

One of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco and the United States, the Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge that spans the Golden Gate Strait, connecting San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean.

The bridge is 4,200 feet long and is held up by two main cables, each supported by 27,572 separate strands of wire.

In volume 1 of The New Human Revolution, SGI President Ikeda likens the combined strength of the wires to the Buddhist concept of the unity of “many in body, one in mind.” Speaking to San Francisco leaders in October 1960, with the view of the magnificent Golden Gate Bridge before them, he said:

It’s true that the individual wires are not very thick, but when bunched together in great numbers, they display incredible strength. This resembles the unity of itai doshin (many in body, one in mind). In the Soka Gakkai, too, though each person’s strength may be small, when that strength is combined and the members are firmly united, they can display unimaginable power. Unity is strength.

From now on, you must play a central role in unifying the members’ efforts to support the kosen-rufu movement and the happiness of the people of San Francisco.[2]The New Human Revolution, vol. 1, p. 119.

The Golden Gate Bridge graces the cover of this month’s issue as a nod to the feature on the unity of “many in body, one in mind” as the key to victory in all spheres, as we advance toward the 50,000 Lions of Justice Festival on September 23.

Notes   [ + ]

1. “Many in Body, One in Mind,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin,
vol. 1, p. 618.
2. The New Human Revolution, vol. 1, p. 119.

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